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Heritage and history

Arrowtown: a picture-perfect living museum

Autumn. That’s the time to visit. Much of this part of the South Island takes on a splendid glow at that time of year. None more so than Arrowtown which is, frankly, already right off the cutesy scale as it is.  Read the story . . . 

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Heritage and history

Olveston House: how the other half lived

Designed by a London architect and built in 1904 – well, this was really something. Ostentatious as all hell, Olveston was also lavishly decorated. Read the story . . . 

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Natural attractions

Devonport and North Head: Victorian village meets mysterious fort

North Head is the logical location for a picnic day out, which can also include lazing nearby on some of Auckland’s prettiest beaches and exploring Devonport’s boutique charm.  Read the story . . . 

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Food and drink

Dunedin city: Edinburgh of the south

‘Dunedin’ is an ancient name for Edinburgh and the resemblance doesn’t stop at the names. Read the story . . . 

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Natural attractions

Farewell Spit: a sandy phenomenon

Extending 35km east in a sweeping arc east from the northernmost extremity of the South Island, Farewell Spit is the longest natural sandbar in the world. Read the story . . . 

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Natural attractions

New Plymouth’s Coastal Walkway: welcome to Taradise

New Plymouth has grown into a funky little city with the view from just about everywhere dominated by Taranaki’s paternal presence. Read the story . . . 

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Activities

New Zealand Rugby Museum

There is only one true religion round here, mate, and that’s rugby union. Read the story . . . 

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Natural attractions

Mount Tarawera: sleeping giant

Lake Tarawera, at the foot of the ruins of Mount Tarawera, is the site of New Zealand’s creepiest ghost story. Read the story . . . 

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Activities

Lake Taupō: the great lake

Lake Taupō is actually the drowned caldera of a super volcano, whose eruption in the first century AD caused meteorological effects noted by sky-gazers as far afield as Rome and China. Read the story . . . 

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Natural attractions

Lake Tekapō: shimmering beauty

By day, the view’s pretty spectacular – the arid splendour of the Mackenzie Country dominated by Aoraki Mount Cook. But you really want to be here when it gets dark...  Read the story . . . 

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Natural attractions

Otago Peninsula: prodigious wildlife and a bona fide castle

If ever you should tire of the splendours of Dunedin, explore the Otago Peninsula, extending from the city to the northeast, to the southern headland of the entrance to the harbour. Read the story . . . 

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Natural attractions

Te Mata Peak: Hawke's Bay icon

From Te Mata Peak, on a clear day, you can see the whole of Hawke’s Bay laid out before you – up to Māhia Peninsula in the north and the rugged hills behind the coast to the south. Read the story . . . 

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Heritage and history

The Beehive and Parliament Buildings

The Parliament Buildings are pretty fancy. All that Tākaka marble, the pillars, the columns and porticoes are hardly what you’d see on an architect’s easel these days. Read the story . . . 

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Natural attractions

The Bridge to Nowhere

When the road disappeared in the bush, grasses and lichens colonised the span and the deck of the bridge – the grandest in a tramping track you’ll ever see. Read the story . . . 

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Activities

Whakarewarewa Valley

Picturing the transition from their homeland to the decidedly sub-tropical rigours of New Zealand, you can imagine the attraction of Whakarewarewa for the first Polynesian settlers. Read the story . . . 

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Activities

Waitomo: sheep, caves, waterfalls and a rugby great

The golden land stretches out seemingly forever and the place sparkles in sunshine many days of the year with ripe green grass as your view. It’s terrific.   Read the story . . . 

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